Sacramento Public Library

Most circulated books of 2016

1/5/2017
Including best-selected fiction and nonfiction and a look ahead at 2017
 
January is a time of renewal. It’s a time to reflect on the previous 12 months and move forward with both triumphs and lessons learned.
 
One of the great triumphs of the past year were the books we read. At Sacramento Public Library (SPL), we're reflecting back on the great reads of 2016 and have compiled the top items circulated, as well as those books we've selected as the best of the year.
 

TOP CIRCULATED FICTION 2016


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All the Light We Cannot See BY Anthony Doerr


A blind French girl on the run from the German occupation and a German orphan-turned-Resistance tracker struggle with respective beliefs after meeting on the Brittany coast.



 


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Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff


Marrying in a whirlwind amid predictions of future greatness, Lotto and Mathilde are shaped throughout a subsequent shared decade by complications, secrets, and powerful creative drives.



 

Read the full TOP CIRCULATED FICTION list…


TOP CIRCULATED NONFICTION 2016

 

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Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow


Traces the life of Alexander Hamilton, an illegitimate, largely self-taught orphan from the Caribbean who rose to become George Washington's aide-de-camp and the first Treasury Secretary of the United States.
 





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Between the World and Me BY Ta-Nehisi Coates


The author presents a history of racial discrimination in the United States and a narrative of his own personal experiences of contemporary race relations, offering possible resolutions for the future.
 




Read the full top circulated nonfiction list…


BEST FICTION 2016

 

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Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson


Torn between the fantasies of her youth and the realities of a life marked by violence and abandonment, August reunites with a beloved old friend who challenges her to reconcile her past and come to terms with the difficulties that forced her to grow up too quickly.

 





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Barkskins by Annie Proulx


Working as woodcutters under a feudal lord in 17th-century New France, two impoverished young Frenchmen follow separate journeys, one of extraordinary hardship, the other of wealth and craftiness, that shape their families throughout three centuries.
 




Read the full best fiction list… 


BEST NONFICTION 2016

 

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All the Single Ladies: Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation by Rebecca Traister


Examines the history of unmarried women in the United States to reveal that the concept of a powerful single woman, often perceived as a modern phenomenon, is not a new idea and explores the options, besides traditional marriage, that were historically available to women. 

 



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American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst by Jeffrey Toobin


An account of the sensational 1974 kidnapping and trial of Patty Hearst describes the efforts of her family to secure her release, Hearst's baffling participation in a bank robbery and the psychological insights that prompted modern understandings about Stockholm syndrome.

A LOOK AHEAD AT 2017

 

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16th Seduction by James Patterson


Things were looking up for Det. Lindsay Boxer, as husband Joe helped her catch a bomb-happy madman. Now, even as a wave of possibly provoked heart attacks hits San Francisco, Joe has betrayed her, the bomber's lawyer casts doubt on the investigation, and Lindsay might end up on trial.






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A Darkness Absolute by Kelley Armstrong


Homicide detective Casey Duncan and fellow deputy, Will, are stranded in a blizzard, only to discover a captive former resident and two murder victims who may or may not have been targeted by an outsider in their off-the-grid community.






Read the full look ahead list...




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